Showing posts tagged diy

Jay Leno’s Garage Featuring Custom Built Motor Scooters

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On a recent episode of Jay Leno’s Garage, Randy Grubb, an automotive artist, stopped by to show Jay his custom-built motor scooters. Check it out here! http://laughingsquid.com/jay-lenos-garage-features-randy-grubbs-custom-built-decopod-bi-pod-and-tri-pod-motor-scooters/

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While you’re on a DIY vehicle kick, you can check out “Do-It-Yourself High Performance Car Mods: Rule the Streets.”

Amazon link to Do-It-Yourself High Performance Car Mods: Rule the Streets: http://www.amazon.com/Do-It-Yourself-High-Performance-Car-Mods/dp/0071804099/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1384360935&sr=8-1&keywords=Do-It-Yourself+High+Performance+Car+Mods

Willeford’s Steampunk Reviewed

http://geekdad.com/2013/12/steampunk-adventurers-guide/

“Thomas Willeford has done it again… a great costume/prop project [book] for yourself, but it sure looks fun for some parent/child time.”

Die-Hard British Batman Fan Makes Batmobile

http://www.buzzfeed.com/scottybryan/die-hard-batman-fan-makes-an-actual-working-batmobile

There was a recreation of the batmobile by a die-hard Batman fan in the UK (pictured above). It’s got an after-burner, flame-thrower, the works. Check out the link above.

You can recreate your own version of a batmobile or any car of your dreams with Do-It-Yourself High Performance Car Mods: Rule the Streets.”

Amazon link to Do-It-Yourself High Performance Car Mods: Rule the Streets: http://www.amazon.com/Do-It-Yourself-High-Performance-Car-Mods/dp/0071804099/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1384360935&sr=8-1&keywords=Do-It-Yourself+High+Performance+Car+Mods

Check out the latest release from TAB Books! The TAB Guide to DIY Welding is a self-teaching guide for hobbyists, handymen, and artists. It show you how to get started with metal-inert gas (MIG) welding (the easiest to learn) and metalworking. In addition to teaching you how to use the MIG welder, the book provides illustrated instructions on being safe, setting up a workspace, selecting and sourcing steel, properly using the right tools, and getting acquainted with the oxy-acetylene torch and plasma cutter. You also get step-by-step walkthroughs for several projects, including making a barbeque grill, a table, a garden cart, fireplace log holders, and more. Maybe you thought welding and metalwork were beyond your abilities, but author Jackson Morley makes it all simple and clear! Jackson studied industrial design at the University of Kansas and currently teaches sheet metal forming, bicycle maintenance, and MIG welding courses at the Steel Yard in Providence, Rhode Island.

Mini Maker Faire Vegas 2013 Highlights:

Just a little taste to get us pumped for the Maker Faire Bay Area 2013. Make sure you look for the TAB Booth!

Are you interested in getting into electronics as a hobby but feel intimidated by the tools and terminology? Do you have some experience with basic electronics but haven’t made the leap to programming the Arduino or building projects with sensors and modules? You’re in luck! 

TAB Books has just published Hacking Electronics: An Illustrated DIY Guide for Makers and Hobbyists by Simon Monk. 

This beautiful, full-color book contains everything you need to know to get started with your own electronics projects. Inside, you’ll find descriptions of the basic tools you’ll need, as well as explanations of how to solder and how to read a multimeter. You’ll also learn a little electrical theory so you understand why things work. 

But mostly you’ll get hands-on practical descriptions and examples. And best of all, you’ll learn how to make things — whether you’re building the from scratch, assembling modules, or hacking components from old devices into new uses.

This book packs so much into its nearly 300 pages, that even seasoned experimenters will find plenty of new ideas and valuable reference material. It’s the next best thing to having a seasoned mentor standing at your side!

Brooklyn Aerodrome Flight School

Check out this Kickstarter from our friends at Brooklyn Aerodrome!

 

Reaching students with an exciting, rigorous aerospace engineering curriculum.

 Launched: Feb 11, 2013

Funding ends: Mar 13, 2013

The Brooklyn Aerodrome Flight School project takes the DIY hutzpah that drives our remote controlled airplanes and kicks it over to middle school science and technology education. We have always wanted to make a serious education play and our collaboration with teacher Andrew Woodbridge does it better than we could imagine.

We met Andrew at the World Maker Faire after which he built our scratch built/recycled plane the Flack (short for Flying + Hack). He wanted to take it into his classroom and a Kickstarter was born. 

The broad goal of this Kickstarter is to get middle schoolers exposed to a 10 hour curriculum around the basics of flight. The Phase 1 curriculum focuses on gliders made out of paper and foam. This is an active, hands on curriculum with very little structure in controlling what the students make, but lots of structure around goals, design and assessment.

The curriculum materials connect to real world aviation. They include:

  • Pilot Licenses
  • Check Rides
  • Air-worthiness Certificates
  • Airfield Rules and Regulations

Read more here

Boost Electronics Knowledge With Practical Electronics for Inventors
By James Floyd Kelly
I spent years trying to teach myself the basics of electronics. I had a few basic electronics courses in engineering school, but they were high-end theory, and only years later did I find it unusual that there was never one instance of putting a soldering iron in any student’s hand. I always equated assembling your own circuits to be something extremely complex (and it can be, of course) and something that I would likely never be able to grasp and implement as a hobby. Electronics wasn’t my main area of study, but I recognized that a better understanding of it would likely have led my career in a different direction.
After college and a few years of working, I once again found myself wanting to create some things that would involve a better understanding of electronics than I possessed. So I went on the hunt for some books… found a few… and was sorely disappointed. Either the books were too simplistic with zero hands-on or they jumped to quickly into complex equations that I knew were overkill for the kinds of circuits I wanted to build. I discovered Make magazine back in 2005 and was immediately taken with many projects that looked possible with just a little bit of experience with a soldering iron (I had that!) and a better understanding of wiring up a schematic using a breadboard (I lacked that). But a new career started up in 2006, my first child arrived in 2007, and the next thing I knew… teaching myself electronics took a backseat. For a bit.
In late 2009, I picked up a copy of Make: Electronics by Charles Platt. A quick flip through the book told me that this was the one. I chose to document my experience as I worked through the book on a blog, including photos, videos, and commentary on each of the 36 projects. It was one of the most enjoyable self-training experiences of my life, and the bump in my understanding of electronics, reading schematics, breadboarding, soldering, and a slew of other skills increased immediately. (As a matter of fact, I still read through the book and my blog notes each year, just to keep it firm in my mind.)
And now it’s 2013. I’ve had a lot of fun over the last three years — I’ve built a number of little gizmos from schematics I’ve found on the Internet or in the pages of many magazines. I’ve even designed a few of my own simple circuits (and burned out a few before discovering my errors) and integrated them into little devices I’ve given to my sons. What’s funny to me is that some of these circuits are extremely complex, but I’m able to build them simply because I finally learned how to use a breadboard properly! But now I’ve got that bug again… and it means taking my understanding of electronics a bit deeper. But there isn’t a Make: Electronics II to purchase! This means another book search…
Thankfully, Charles Platt referenced a certain book in Make: Electronics that I managed to hunt down a few years back. It mostly sat on my bookshelf, but every few projects I’d find myself reaching for it and digging in to understand a particular component or concept a little better. If there is a successor to Make: Electronics, then I believe it would have to be Practical Electronics for Inventors. And here’s the best part — the Third Edition has just arrived in bookstores with some big updates from the Second Edition that includes substantial coverage of sensors, microcontrollers (including Arduino and BASIC stamp), and a very interesting chapter (16) on modular electronics that is all the rage these days with companies offering up plug-n-play circuit boards for all sorts of functionality. Practical Electronics for Inventors is written by Paul Scherz and Simon Monk, and its sixteen chapters and three appendices will take up almost 1,000 pages of your valuable shelf space. And you’ll be glad you found the space for it, trust me. Yes, it’s got theory. Yuck. I’m a big avoider of equations and charts, but I have to admit that I’ve actually read through some of the math and found myself nodding… not from a complete understanding, but more of an Okay, so there is a method to the madness that is capacitor storage.
Read more here.

Boost Electronics Knowledge With Practical Electronics for Inventors

By James Floyd Kelly

I spent years trying to teach myself the basics of electronics. I had a few basic electronics courses in engineering school, but they were high-end theory, and only years later did I find it unusual that there was never one instance of putting a soldering iron in any student’s hand. I always equated assembling your own circuits to be something extremely complex (and it can be, of course) and something that I would likely never be able to grasp and implement as a hobby. Electronics wasn’t my main area of study, but I recognized that a better understanding of it would likely have led my career in a different direction.

After college and a few years of working, I once again found myself wanting to create some things that would involve a better understanding of electronics than I possessed. So I went on the hunt for some books… found a few… and was sorely disappointed. Either the books were too simplistic with zero hands-on or they jumped to quickly into complex equations that I knew were overkill for the kinds of circuits I wanted to build. I discovered Make magazine back in 2005 and was immediately taken with many projects that looked possible with just a little bit of experience with a soldering iron (I had that!) and a better understanding of wiring up a schematic using a breadboard (I lacked that). But a new career started up in 2006, my first child arrived in 2007, and the next thing I knew… teaching myself electronics took a backseat. For a bit.

In late 2009, I picked up a copy of Make: Electronics by Charles Platt. A quick flip through the book told me that this was the one. I chose to document my experience as I worked through the book on a blog, including photos, videos, and commentary on each of the 36 projects. It was one of the most enjoyable self-training experiences of my life, and the bump in my understanding of electronics, reading schematics, breadboarding, soldering, and a slew of other skills increased immediately. (As a matter of fact, I still read through the book and my blog notes each year, just to keep it firm in my mind.)

And now it’s 2013. I’ve had a lot of fun over the last three years — I’ve built a number of little gizmos from schematics I’ve found on the Internet or in the pages of many magazines. I’ve even designed a few of my own simple circuits (and burned out a few before discovering my errors) and integrated them into little devices I’ve given to my sons. What’s funny to me is that some of these circuits are extremely complex, but I’m able to build them simply because I finally learned how to use a breadboard properly! But now I’ve got that bug again… and it means taking my understanding of electronics a bit deeper. But there isn’t a Make: Electronics II to purchase! This means another book search…

Thankfully, Charles Platt referenced a certain book in Make: Electronics that I managed to hunt down a few years back. It mostly sat on my bookshelf, but every few projects I’d find myself reaching for it and digging in to understand a particular component or concept a little better. If there is a successor to Make: Electronics, then I believe it would have to be Practical Electronics for Inventors. And here’s the best part — the Third Edition has just arrived in bookstores with some big updates from the Second Edition that includes substantial coverage of sensors, microcontrollers (including Arduino and BASIC stamp), and a very interesting chapter (16) on modular electronics that is all the rage these days with companies offering up plug-n-play circuit boards for all sorts of functionality. Practical Electronics for Inventors is written by Paul Scherz and Simon Monk, and its sixteen chapters and three appendices will take up almost 1,000 pages of your valuable shelf space. And you’ll be glad you found the space for it, trust me. Yes, it’s got theory. Yuck. I’m a big avoider of equations and charts, but I have to admit that I’ve actually read through some of the math and found myself nodding… not from a complete understanding, but more of an Okay, so there is a method to the madness that is capacitor storage.

Read more here.