Showing posts tagged Make
Boost Electronics Knowledge With Practical Electronics for Inventors
By James Floyd Kelly
I spent years trying to teach myself the basics of electronics. I had a few basic electronics courses in engineering school, but they were high-end theory, and only years later did I find it unusual that there was never one instance of putting a soldering iron in any student’s hand. I always equated assembling your own circuits to be something extremely complex (and it can be, of course) and something that I would likely never be able to grasp and implement as a hobby. Electronics wasn’t my main area of study, but I recognized that a better understanding of it would likely have led my career in a different direction.
After college and a few years of working, I once again found myself wanting to create some things that would involve a better understanding of electronics than I possessed. So I went on the hunt for some books… found a few… and was sorely disappointed. Either the books were too simplistic with zero hands-on or they jumped to quickly into complex equations that I knew were overkill for the kinds of circuits I wanted to build. I discovered Make magazine back in 2005 and was immediately taken with many projects that looked possible with just a little bit of experience with a soldering iron (I had that!) and a better understanding of wiring up a schematic using a breadboard (I lacked that). But a new career started up in 2006, my first child arrived in 2007, and the next thing I knew… teaching myself electronics took a backseat. For a bit.
In late 2009, I picked up a copy of Make: Electronics by Charles Platt. A quick flip through the book told me that this was the one. I chose to document my experience as I worked through the book on a blog, including photos, videos, and commentary on each of the 36 projects. It was one of the most enjoyable self-training experiences of my life, and the bump in my understanding of electronics, reading schematics, breadboarding, soldering, and a slew of other skills increased immediately. (As a matter of fact, I still read through the book and my blog notes each year, just to keep it firm in my mind.)
And now it’s 2013. I’ve had a lot of fun over the last three years — I’ve built a number of little gizmos from schematics I’ve found on the Internet or in the pages of many magazines. I’ve even designed a few of my own simple circuits (and burned out a few before discovering my errors) and integrated them into little devices I’ve given to my sons. What’s funny to me is that some of these circuits are extremely complex, but I’m able to build them simply because I finally learned how to use a breadboard properly! But now I’ve got that bug again… and it means taking my understanding of electronics a bit deeper. But there isn’t a Make: Electronics II to purchase! This means another book search…
Thankfully, Charles Platt referenced a certain book in Make: Electronics that I managed to hunt down a few years back. It mostly sat on my bookshelf, but every few projects I’d find myself reaching for it and digging in to understand a particular component or concept a little better. If there is a successor to Make: Electronics, then I believe it would have to be Practical Electronics for Inventors. And here’s the best part — the Third Edition has just arrived in bookstores with some big updates from the Second Edition that includes substantial coverage of sensors, microcontrollers (including Arduino and BASIC stamp), and a very interesting chapter (16) on modular electronics that is all the rage these days with companies offering up plug-n-play circuit boards for all sorts of functionality. Practical Electronics for Inventors is written by Paul Scherz and Simon Monk, and its sixteen chapters and three appendices will take up almost 1,000 pages of your valuable shelf space. And you’ll be glad you found the space for it, trust me. Yes, it’s got theory. Yuck. I’m a big avoider of equations and charts, but I have to admit that I’ve actually read through some of the math and found myself nodding… not from a complete understanding, but more of an Okay, so there is a method to the madness that is capacitor storage.
Read more here.

Boost Electronics Knowledge With Practical Electronics for Inventors

By James Floyd Kelly

I spent years trying to teach myself the basics of electronics. I had a few basic electronics courses in engineering school, but they were high-end theory, and only years later did I find it unusual that there was never one instance of putting a soldering iron in any student’s hand. I always equated assembling your own circuits to be something extremely complex (and it can be, of course) and something that I would likely never be able to grasp and implement as a hobby. Electronics wasn’t my main area of study, but I recognized that a better understanding of it would likely have led my career in a different direction.

After college and a few years of working, I once again found myself wanting to create some things that would involve a better understanding of electronics than I possessed. So I went on the hunt for some books… found a few… and was sorely disappointed. Either the books were too simplistic with zero hands-on or they jumped to quickly into complex equations that I knew were overkill for the kinds of circuits I wanted to build. I discovered Make magazine back in 2005 and was immediately taken with many projects that looked possible with just a little bit of experience with a soldering iron (I had that!) and a better understanding of wiring up a schematic using a breadboard (I lacked that). But a new career started up in 2006, my first child arrived in 2007, and the next thing I knew… teaching myself electronics took a backseat. For a bit.

In late 2009, I picked up a copy of Make: Electronics by Charles Platt. A quick flip through the book told me that this was the one. I chose to document my experience as I worked through the book on a blog, including photos, videos, and commentary on each of the 36 projects. It was one of the most enjoyable self-training experiences of my life, and the bump in my understanding of electronics, reading schematics, breadboarding, soldering, and a slew of other skills increased immediately. (As a matter of fact, I still read through the book and my blog notes each year, just to keep it firm in my mind.)

And now it’s 2013. I’ve had a lot of fun over the last three years — I’ve built a number of little gizmos from schematics I’ve found on the Internet or in the pages of many magazines. I’ve even designed a few of my own simple circuits (and burned out a few before discovering my errors) and integrated them into little devices I’ve given to my sons. What’s funny to me is that some of these circuits are extremely complex, but I’m able to build them simply because I finally learned how to use a breadboard properly! But now I’ve got that bug again… and it means taking my understanding of electronics a bit deeper. But there isn’t a Make: Electronics II to purchase! This means another book search…

Thankfully, Charles Platt referenced a certain book in Make: Electronics that I managed to hunt down a few years back. It mostly sat on my bookshelf, but every few projects I’d find myself reaching for it and digging in to understand a particular component or concept a little better. If there is a successor to Make: Electronics, then I believe it would have to be Practical Electronics for Inventors. And here’s the best part — the Third Edition has just arrived in bookstores with some big updates from the Second Edition that includes substantial coverage of sensors, microcontrollers (including Arduino and BASIC stamp), and a very interesting chapter (16) on modular electronics that is all the rage these days with companies offering up plug-n-play circuit boards for all sorts of functionality. Practical Electronics for Inventors is written by Paul Scherz and Simon Monk, and its sixteen chapters and three appendices will take up almost 1,000 pages of your valuable shelf space. And you’ll be glad you found the space for it, trust me. Yes, it’s got theory. Yuck. I’m a big avoider of equations and charts, but I have to admit that I’ve actually read through some of the math and found myself nodding… not from a complete understanding, but more of an Okay, so there is a method to the madness that is capacitor storage.

Read more here.

Pretty cool!  The TAB team will be tuning in for sure.

Welcome to Steampunk…

Thomas Willeford, aka Lord Archibald “Feathers” Featherstone, and Lady Clankington explain what Steampunk is all about and show off the Steampunk goggles that are featured in his new book Steampunk Gear, Gadgets, and Gizmos: A Maker’s Guide to Creating Modern Artifacts!


Congratulations to Dave from San Jose!

Dave was the winner of TAB’s Bay Area Maker Faire prize drawing for a complete set of EVIL GENIUS books. Enjoy, Dave. Make great stuff!

TAB Stand Maker Faire `

Check out all of the great TAB DIY books we had on our stand at MF:
TAB Maker Faire Bookstore